Introduction Videos in English, French, & Ojibway.

Honour Song (Ojibway)

Get Help Now

For on campus support, click on your college link below to find out where to go or who to call. If you are on campus right now, consider going directly to the counselling/advising service, or to anyone you may feel comfortable talking with at your college.

If you are feeling overwhelmed, anxious, stressed, depressed or have other mental health concerns, click on your college link below for assistance from qualified staff on campus.

Do you need help now?

If you are considering suicide or harming yourself, it is time to get some help right now! Contact the hospital closest to you or call 911. Qualified staff will ensure you are safe while starting to provide some assistance to you.

Direct help and referral:

Good2Talk , Ontario’s Postsecondary Student Helpline is there to assist you 24/7/365 in both English and French, call 1-866-925-5454. Good2Talk is a free, completely confidential and anonymous service that offers you professional counselling, mental health information and connections to local resources.

If you are looking for direct information about other services in your community such as health care, housing, income support, transportation or community programs among other services, phone 211. Or visit the website .

Services for First Nations Students:

Cambrian College Wabnode Centre

Canadore College First Peoples’ Centre

Confederation College Negahneewin Student Services

Northern College Aboriginal Services

Sault College Native Education

Additional resources in the north. Other resources found at 211.ca

North Bay District

Sault Ste Marie District

  • Talk for Healing: Helpline, open 24/7 for Aboriginal women in Northern Ontario who feel isolated.
  • Batchewana First Nations: Provides mental health counselling, case management and referrals to other service providers and programs

Sudbury District

Timmins – James Bay

  • Talk for Healing: Helpline, open 24/7 for Aboriginal women in Northern Ontario who feel isolated.
  • WAHA: Community Counselors are available to assist WAHA community members requiring mental health services in Attawapiskat, Peawanuck, Kashechewan, Fort Albany and Moosonee.

Thunder Bay District

Mental health problems: a common occurrence on campus

You are not alone. Many adults will experience a mental health problem at some point in their lives. It can be caused by many things and the symptoms vary for each person. The problem can lead to stress, anxiety and depression. Mental health problems can contribute to the following situations and/or make the situations worse:

  • Sexual, emotional, verbal or physical abuse and assault
  • Exams, mid-terms, term papers and other school work
  • Substance use (some drugs act as depressants and may make your symptoms worse)
  • Anxiety and mood problems
  • Coping with grief, the death of a loved one or loss
  • Personal and/or social relationships (family, romantic and platonic)
  • Eating disorders and body image difficulties
  • Feelings of homesickness or loneliness
  • Social isolation from your peer group
  • Challenges with self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Questions regarding and challenges related to your sexuality and sexual orientation
  • Transition to college/university life
  • Experiences with racism or other prejudice

What's On Your Mind?

Anxiety & Stress

Feelings of anxiety and stress can happen at many different times in your life. Anxious feelings may be caused by a combination of things such as exams, social isolation, personal loss and/or biological factors, such as health problems. As a student, class presentations, exams, group work, being away from home, social interactions, break-ups and financial problems can all create anxiety and stress. Sometimes these feelings can affect activities of life such as relationships with family, friends, and school work. Stress can also cause symptoms such as headaches, stomach upsets, back pain, trouble sleeping and difficulty concentrating.

What Can You Do?

It is important to discuss how you’re feeling with a trained person. The key is to understand the problem and seek assistance. There is hope.

You may find some of the strategies many students use, such as meditation and breathing exercises, help to control feelings related to anxiety. Eating properly, avoiding caffeine, and exercising regularly all help. You may also benefit from support groups to help you manage anxiety and stress.

If you think that you are experiencing anxiety or stress more than you should, consider talking with a counsellor or advisor at your college. The service is free, confidential and staff are trained to help students find resources to improve their situation. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in your community for help.

For more information about anxiety disorders, consult the Canadian Mental Health Association's website.

Sad & Blue

Why do we feel sad sometimes?

Listen to Steven Page from the Bare Naked Ladies give an interview about his battle with depression.

Many of us have felt down in the dumps or sad or alone from time to time. This can happen when the pressures of deadlines, family responsibilities or social difficulties cause us to feel overwhelmed. When the ‘blues’ become too much to handle or last for a long period of time, it may be a sign of depression. Depression is a medical condition that can make coping with everyday life difficult. It is caused by an imbalance in brain chemistry that can be triggered by stress, illness, personal loss, school difficulties, or interpersonal stressors.

What Can You Do?

If you think that you feel blue or sad or it feels as if life is without hope and you’ve felt this way for several weeks, consider discussing how you are feeling with the counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people sort out their problems. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information about depression:

Suicide

If you have thoughts of suicide…

If you ever find yourself thinking about suicide, or hurting yourself, you’re not alone. Feelings of hopelessness, pain, and desperation can cause a person to consider suicide as the only option.

It is important to reach out and seek help as soon as you begin to have these thoughts. People who are thinking about suicide can be helped with the proper treatment. If you feel that you are ready to plan your suicide, you should go to the counselling/advising services at your college or contact 911 right away.

What Can You Do?

The first step is to tell someone. This is not always easy to do because you already feel that there is no other way out and perhaps you’re feeling ashamed. But there is nothing to feel ashamed about. Many people have felt this way, more than you think, and have been helped and currently are living normal lives.

Who can you talk to? Perhaps a friend or family member, member of the clergy, a social worker or counsellor or staff at your college can be of assistance to you. For directions, go to the Get Help Now section. Explore the ways you might get help through the resource section of this website.

Other people to reach out to may be the residence assistants if you’re in residence. You’ve made the right decision in looking for help. We hope you contact someone right now.

For more information about suicide:

If you are having thoughts of suicide now, please stop long enough to read this. It will only take about five minutes. I do not want to talk you out of your bad feelings. I am not a therapist or other mental health professional - only someone who knows what it is like to be in pain. Read this first.

Other Issues

Are there other issues impacting your mental health? Read below to learn more .

I sometimes cut my arms or burn myself.

Self injury is the act of hurting oneself. This can be seen as a coping strategy for psychological pain. People sometimes find physical pain from cutting, burning, picking at skin or hair or punching themselves to be a relief from the unbearable pain caused by something else happening in their lives. Usually, it is a sign that they don’t have the coping strategies in place to deal with their problems and self injury is the only way they know how to deal with their problems. Feelings of loneliness, depression or anger may cause a buildup of tension which may lead to self injury.

People who self injure can come from any background. Self injury is a behavior or coping method that does not discriminate. It may impact people who are rich or poor, young, not so young, high school or college students. They may be from any profession. Most often, people who harm themselves may start the behaviour in high school or postsecondary. It’s important to know that there is help available. This is a serious situation that requires attention and the help of professionals. For more information consult the Canadian Mental Health Association or see your family doctor.

I sometimes eat too much then make myself throw up.

When a person is  obsessed with limiting the intake of food to the point of starvation (anorexia),  or eating excessive amounts at one time (binge), or purging after eating (bulimia), or even exercising compulsively (anorexia athletic), he or she may have an eating disorder.

These disorders can have a devastating impact on general health. Symptoms may include extreme thinness, thinning of the bones, brittle hair and nails, severe constipation, low blood pressure, brain damage and other symptoms. Symptoms of purging include chronically inflamed sore throat,, worn tooth enamel, acid reflux, intestinal distress and dehydration.

There is treatment and help for this disorder. There are many treatment clinics that have good results with group therapies, medical care and medications. The important action to stress is to tell your family doctor or college counselling/advising staff as soon as possible. They will help you get to the help you need.

For more information about eating disorders consult the National Eating Disorder Information Centre .

I use drugs and/or alcohol almost every day, and sometimes a lot.

If you think that you use alcohol or drugs more frequently than you should or if you have increased your use lately, consider discussing this with counselling or advising staff at your college.

The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained to help students sort out their problems and/or find appropriate resources.

Substance use can be harmful and can have a negative impact on health and academic studies. Physical effects can include impaired judgment, high-risk sexual contact, social embarrassment, injury or even death. In addition operating a vehicle or equipment when impaired adds an additional risk factor. Mixing alcohol with other drugs whether prescribed medication or illegal substances can cause additional harmful results,

Academically, the use of substances to excess can cause students to have lowered motivation, tiredness, and lack of interest, reduced effort and in general, lower than expected grades.

For more information consult the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health .

Sometimes I feel confused and hear voices.

If you are experiencing delusions, hallucinations, hear voices and perhaps have feelings of confusion, you may need help right away. Only a qualified practitioner can work with you to find the right diagnosis and treatment options. These conditions can be treated.

If you think that you feel confused, or out of touch with reality, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college.

For more information about psychosis:

For more information about schizophrenia:

Remember, your college has staff who are people first and who care to help you! Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

In addition there is the postsecondary helpline, good2talk, available 24/7 to answer your phone call. We are all here to help support your learning.

Stay Well

Get The Facts.

Anxiety Disorders

Many of us feel some type of anxiety at different times of our life. The anxious feelings may be caused by a combination of life events such as exams, an animal attack, personal loss, and ∕ or biological factors such as health problems. For students, there can be many triggers for anxiety. Class presentations, exams, group work, new surroundings away from home, social interactions, emotional relationship break-ups, financial problems; all may impact on an individual to create anxious feelings. If these feelings persist or are intense enough to interfere with activities, a person may have an anxiety disorder. This condition can affect activities of life such as relationships with family, friends, and many academic tasks.

For some people, the anxiety is triggered by brain chemistry and can run in families. In others, certain medical conditions such as anemia and thyroid problems can also cause anxiety. Conditions are further affected by some medications, alcohol, drugs and caffeine.

Anxiety disorders are the most common of all mental health problems and are found in about 1 in 10 people. Anxiety disorders can be classed as panic disorder, phobia, social phobia, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

What can you do?

Anxiety disorders can be treated. The main approaches are drug therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy or a combination of both. The key is to understand the problem and seek assistance. It can be managed.

Many students find that meditation and breathing exercises help to control the feelings associated with anxiety. Eating properly, avoiding caffeine, and exercising regularly such as taking a walk all help in addition to the therapies. Often support groups also help manage the impact.

If you think that you are experiencing anxieties more than you should, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people sort out their problems. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information about anxiety disorders:

  • Consult the Canadian Mental Health Association’s site to learn about the types of anxiety disorders and lifestyle choices to help.
  • The CMHA also has a site with information about panic disorders and phobias.
  • Hear a description of anxiety from a student Summer Beretsky who has anxiety and panic attacks.

Depression

Many of us feel depressed at different times of our life. But a major depressive disorder, depression, is more than an occasional feeling of being down. Depression is the effort of managing feelings of severe despair for an extended period of time. People in depression have difficulty understanding that there will be a change or help for their situation.

Depression affects every part of a life. It affects academic activities, physical health, social life, work and in fact, all aspects. People who are experiencing major depression may have some of the following symptoms:

  • Lack of energy
  • Withdrawal from social activities
  • Appetite loss, or overeating
  • Missing class, events, appointments
  • Difficulty sleeping, always tired
  • Physical problems such as pain, headaches, digestive problems that don’t go away even with treatment
  • Forgetfulness, inability to concentrate
  • Lack of interest in pleasurable activities
  • Feelings of sadness, hopelessness or helplessness
  • Sometimes thoughts of suicide

Major depression is disabling and prevents a person from normal functioning. People may have only one episode in their lifetime, while others may have many episodes. There are various types of depression, some caused by chemical imbalances such as seasonal affective disorder, postpartum depression, and psychotic depression. Sometimes the depression starts out as a minor depression for about two weeks and without help, this could develop into a major depressive disorder.

What can you do?

Depression may be caused by a combination of factors, genetic, biological, environmental and psychological. There is help and treatment for this disorder. There are new medications available to help regulate the chemical imbalances causing the depression. Psychotherapies are also important in treating depression.

If you think that you are experiencing prolonged periods of depression, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people sort out their problems. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information about depression:

Eating Disorders

When a person is obsessed with limiting the intake of food to the point of starvation (anorexia), or eating excessive amounts at one time (binge), or purging after eating (bulimia), or even exercising compulsively (anorexia athletic), he or she may have an eating disorder.

People who have eating disorders may be having difficulty with their self-esteem or body image. They may feel that they have some control over their lives by controlling what they eat.

While dieting and food intake can be valid decisions at certain times, if taken to excess they could cause serious physical and mental damage.

What can you do?

If you think that you may have an eating disorder, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people sort out their problems. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information about eating disorders:

Psychosis and Schizophrenia

These are complex biochemical brain disorders that often first appear in the young adult age. If you are experiencing delusions, hallucinations, hear voices and perhaps have feelings of confusion, you may need help right away. Only a qualified practitioner can work with you to find the right diagnosis and treatment options. These conditions can be treated.

What can you do?

If you think that you feel confused, or out of touch with reality, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people sort out their problems. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information about psychosis:

For more information about schizophrenia:

Self Injury

Self injury is the act of hurting oneself. People do this as a coping strategy for psychological pain. They many find that the physical pain of cutting, burning, picking at skin or hair, or punching themselves is a relief from the unbearable pain caused by something in their lives. Usually it is a sign that they don’t have the coping strategies in place to deal with their problems and the self injury provides an outlet for how they are feeling. It may be that feelings of loneliness, depression or anger are causing a buildup of tension.

People who self injure can come from any background. It may impact people who are rich or poor, high school or college students. They may be from any profession. Most often, people who self injure start the behaviour in high school or postsecondary. It’s important to know that there is help available. This is a serious situation that requires attention and the help of professionals.

What can you do?

If you are harming yourself, you should get help as soon as possible. You might also discuss yourself injuries with your family doctor or someone you trust. Consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people sort out their problems. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other section2 of this site.

For more information about Self Injury:

Stress

Feelings of stress are a normal part of life. Stress is what gets us up in the morning and keeps us moving forward. It’s normal to have feelings of stress before big events such as an exam, a class presentation, a job interview, a new job, a wedding or party, or in times of financial worries. Stress helps keep us awake and on our toes, ready for action.

But sometimes, too much stress can leave a person feeling anxious, on edge, worried. It can also give rise to other symptoms such as headaches, stomach upsets, back pain, trouble sleeping, and trouble concentrating on a task. Stress can even cause some health problems. This can happen during exam week or during a relationship problem or when for some reason a person feels he or she has failed and can’t get back on track. The reasons can vary from individual to individual.

We all have coping strategies that help us manage our stress and stay in balance. But sometimes, when there is too much stress we can be out of balance.

Your life should be a balance of personal time, social activities, exercise, healthy eating, hobbies, and work or school time. When you are stressed, it’s easy to eliminate some of the items that help you stay in balance and managing your stress.

What can you do?

If you think that you feel overwhelming stress, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people identify balance in their lives. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information about stress:

Substance Use Disorder

Substance Use Disorders are often started as a way of coping with stress and peer pressures. Students who are away from home and their support network may turn to drugs and alcohol as a way of coping with loneliness, stress or other problems or as a way of feeling as if they could ‘fit in’ with the new social scene.

A person with a mental health problem has a higher risk of also having a substance use problem and this is called a concurrent disorder. Sometimes a person with an anxiety disorder may also have an alcohol problem or be addicted to medications. Medical professionals agree that substance use can make mental health problems worse.

How may the regular use of drugs or alcohol impact students?

Alcohol:

  • Impaired judgment and reduced inhibition can cause people to make poor decisions or engage in risky behaviour. Alcohol use is often involved in crimes, fights, traffic fatalities and other dangerous events.
  • There may be physical discomfort such as blurred vision, vomiting, stupor, coma, death. Hangovers can cause headache, nausea, diarrhea, shakiness, vomiting and changes in hormone levels.
  • Academically students may experience difficulty remembering and concentrating, a tendency to miss classes, and an overall lower performance.

Drugs:

  • Depending on the drug used the impacts of addiction can be profound. Initially used for short-term relief, addiction can cause changes to the body and brain.
  • Anxiety, irritability, depression, panic attacks.
  • Difficulty thinking and concentrating.
  • Spending money on drugs instead of living essentials.
  • Some drugs such as methamphetamine also can cause paranoid delusions, hallucinations or aggressive behaviour.
  • Over doses can cause seizures,, heart failure, difficulty breathing or other serious physical problems including death.
  • Academically students may experience difficulty remembering, concentrating, attending classroom or workshop activities or finding value in continuing education pursuits.

If you think that you may have a problem with substance abuse, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people identify balance in their lives. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information about substance use disorder:

Suicide

Suicide is the deliberate taking of one’s own life. It is often the result of feelings of hopelessness or grief. People who commit or attempt suicide can be of any age, gender, or social group. However, men are more likely to die by suicide. Most people who die by suicide do not necessarily want to die. They do want the pain they are experiencing to stop.

Who is most likely to be at risk of suicide?

  • People with depression, substance abuse disorder, some other mental disorders.
  • A family history of mental disorders, violence or suicide.
  • Changes in neurotransmitters such as serotonin which is also associated with depression.

Postsecondary students may be at risk for any of the above reasons. Additionally, depression caused by social isolation, academic pressures or negative feelings can be a contributing factor.

How can suicide be prevented?

The first step is to seek help. There are treatments associated with the risk factors as well as talk therapy or cognitive behavioral therapy which can help people learn effective ways of dealing with stressful experiences. Some medications may help.

The important first step is reaching out and informing someone about the thoughts of suicide. If you think that you are thinking about harming yourself, consider discussing how you are feeling with counselling or advising staff at your college. The service is free and confidential and the members of the staff are trained in helping people identify balance in their lives. They may also be able to provide counselling sessions for you or make arrangements in the community. Click on the Get Help Now section for directions or to arrange an appointment.

You might also consider reviewing some of the things you can do to promote your mental health in the other sections of this site.

For more information:

Keeping Yourself in Balance

Good mental health is a balance of factors. Your mental health is affected by what you eat, your sleep patterns, physical condition, your emotional health, relationships, your work or educational pursuits – all in a balance.

When one or more of these factors is causing you problems, your ability to problem solve the issues and return to balance is called resiliency.

There are ways you can increase your resiliency and ability to maintain a balance – but it takes awareness on your part and hard work.

Here are some ideas to promote resiliency and your balanced mental health.

  • Avoid drugs and alcohol. Alcohol and illegal drugs can make you feel less inhibited and more likely to engage in behaviour that may be dangerous to you. The other side effects often impact the ability to learn and remember.
  • Maintain a good social network. Family and friends can be important supports.
  • Use the supports available. Your educational setting likely has staff who are available to discuss issues with you. Often there are extensive supports that can really promote your mental health and academic success. Reach out; they are there to assist you in any way possible.
  • Get as active as possible. Physical activity can reduce stress and depression. Even a walk or jog can help, especially if it’s out of doors. It doesn’t have to be long, 20 minutes is something most people can squeeze into busy days.
  • Eat a balanced diet. Foods contain important nutrients that support learning, memory, and a positive outlook. Try to select healthy choices, even in a busy schedule.
  • Develop good sleep habits. Research shows that a regular schedule with at least 7 hours of sleep each night is important for good health. During this time your body repairs damage caused by life and helps promote physical and emotional health.

Resources that may interest you:

  • Review the Emotional Health Help Guide to learn about anger management, the role of laughter, stress relief, easy exercise tips and more.
  • Review the Exercise & Fitness Help Guide to learn some easy exercises, exercise plan and relaxation exercises.
  • Review the Healthy Eating Help Guide to learn about planning a healthy diet, emotional eating, healthy fast food and more.
  • Review the Memory Help Guide to learn how to improve your memory.
  • Review the Relationships Help Guide to learn about effective communication, conflict resolution, how to make friends, fixing relationship problems and more.
  • Review the Sleep Help Guide to learn about how to sleep better.
  • Visit helpguide.org for the Suicide Prevention Help Guide . This is a good compendium of topics related to understanding suicide and suicide prevention. Topics include suicide help, dealing with depression, suicide prevention, warning signs.

Apps & Instructional Videos

Apps for Mental Health (free or low cost)

PTSD Coach is designed for people living with Post-Traumatic Stress, but can easily be applied to anyone living with anxiety or depression.  It’s available for both iOS (Apple) and Android free from the Apple Store and Google Play Store.

Features include:

  • Tools for screening and tracking your symptoms
  • Convenient, easy-to-use skills to help you handle stress symptoms
  • Direct links to support and help (customizable)
  • Always with you when you need it

BellyBio teaches deep breathing techniques helpful to minimize stress and anxiety. Free app from iTunes Store.

Operation Reach Out is an intervention tool that helps people who are thinking about suicide to reassess their thinking and get help. Developed by the military and available free from iTunes Store.

eCBT is an app that provides calm to people feeling stressed. Assess stress level, provides relaxation skills and includes links to online resources. $0.99 from iTunes.

WhatsMyM3 is a free app from the iTunes Store that can help you assess your current mental health and help you and your doctor determine if you have a mood disorder.

DBT Diary Card and Skills Coach. Developed by a psychologist, this app includes self-help skills, reminders and coaching tools for coping. $4.99 at the iTunes Store this app is highly recommended by existing users.

Optimism is a free app that helps you develop strategies for managing depression, bipolar or other mental health conditions. Available from the iTunes store.

Apps for Health in General

Sleep Aids

From the Best IPhone Fitness Apps review ones specifically to improve your sleep.

  • Sleep Cycle to monitor your movements as you sleep
  • Sleep Bug to provide soothing noise when you sleep
  • Pzizz to create a different soundtrack using binaural beats to help induce relaxation
  • Sleep Aid promises sleep in 20 min or less. Available for free from the iTunes Store.

Exercise Promotion

From the Best IPhone Fitness Apps review ones specifically to create fun workouts or exercises

  • Runno a game to make running in your neighbourhood as much fun as possible
  • Nexercise gives you a chance to win points for any physical activity for gift cards and discounts
  • Zombies, Run! Is an ‘immersive zombie apocalypse running game’ that promises fun while you run
  • BeFit exercise programs including hip-pho cardio to ab workouts.
  • GymGoal Free has 280 exercises with step-by-step instructions and animations.
  • Fitocracy turns fitness into a game in which you earn points, battle the laziness dragon and engage with a community of players.

On Campus

On Campus Challange: A Gallery of Student Expression

The On Campus Challenge included a Contest of student art/expression as a platform to promote mental health and awareness. Students from Cambrian, Canadore, Confederation, and Northern Colleges submitted pieces of art and design that shows how they've experienced mental illness.

The contest had a variety of categories including posters, rants, musical, digital, & other creative artistic submissions. Qualifying submissions would clearly promote the overarching theme of "Promoting mental health and reducing stigma on our campus". We invite you to view the powerful and highly creative submissions by our Northern college students:

Check your mental well-being

Mental health problems covers a broad range of symptoms. The Canadian Mental Health Association has developed an online Mental Health Meter , which allows individuals to assess their mental health and risk for illness. It takes less than five minutes to complete the assessment and provides insight into where we may wish to make changes.

College counsellors have developed a general checklist to help students determine if it might be time to talk with someone. It includes some of the problems commonly reported by college students. While some people may resolve these issues on their own, talking things over with staff can be helpful for those who have ongoing concerns about any or all of the following:

  • Academic and career issues, including poor study skills, problems with test-taking or trouble deciding between two or more college programs;
  • Relationship problems—family or spousal troubles, conflict with a significant other or coping with a break-up;
  • Discomfort in social situations;
  • Feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness or loneliness;
  • Feeling depressed most of the time or having thoughts of suicide;
  • Alcohol and/or drug abuse;
  • Sexual abuse or assault;
  • Coping with stress and/or anxiety, and eating or sleeping too little or too much;
  • Issues of identity and self-esteem, including sexuality, values and belief systems, low self-esteem and negative thinking, and difficulty adjusting to college/university;
  • Feelings that things are hopeless;
  • Feeling overwhelmed by all you had to do;
  • Feeling exhausted (not from physical activity);
  • Feeling very lonely;
  • Feeling very sad;
  • Feeling so depressed that it was difficult to function;
  • Feeling overwhelming anxiety;
  • Feeling overwhelming anger;
  • Seriously considered suicide;
  • Attempted suicide;
  • Intentionally cut, burned, bruised or otherwise injured yourself.

If you’re concerned about any of the above, it may be helpful to speak with a counsellor or advisor on your campus in person or by phone.

Videos

Redpath-The Social Network for Mental Health & Addiction (Translated in Ojibway)